SUNY Korea

History makers,
we change the world

Computer Vision AI Seminar with Stony Brook University

SUNY Koreaㅣ2019-10-31 09:53

In an effort to build connections between SUNY Korea and Stony Brook University researchers, SUNY Korea hosted the Computer Vision AI Seminar on Monday, Oct. 28. 


The seminar offered an opportunity for SUNY Korea faculty and students as well as the local community to interact with computer scientists at Stony Brook University and gain insights into current and emerging research trends in computer science. 


The seminar featured three professors from the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University. Dimitris Samaras, the SUNY Empire Innovation Professor of Computer Science and the Director of Computer Vision Lab at Stony Brook University, kicked off the seminar followed by Dr. Haibin Ling and Dr. Minh Hoai Nguyen from the Computer Science Department at Stony Brook University. 


Dr. Samaras, in his talk titled “Challenges in Annotation, Analysis and Synthesis of MultiGigaPixel Images,” explained what Gigapixel images are and what they can do, as well as the many remaining challenges. After the first session, Se-eun Shin (Korea International Christian School, Grade 11) commented “It was a very interesting topic. Even though I had to look up terms each moment, it was great to experience what it would be like to study at a global university.” 


Dr. Haibin Ling, the SUNY Empire Innovation Professor of Computer Science Department at Stony Brook University, spoke on “Visual Tracking: Challenges, Algorithms and Benchmarks.” Dr. Ling introduced his research on the use of visual tracking algorithms for single-target tracking, plane object tracking, and multi-target tracking. He also presented his research team’s recent work on tracking benchmarks and evaluations. 


In the final lecture of the seminar Dr. Minh Hoai Nguyen, an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook University, presented on “Attentive Human Action Recognition.” He examined the challenges and the successes of human action recognition algorithms in many areas that benefit society such as clinical diagnosis, human-computer interaction, and social robotics. 


The seminar was free and open to the public, and around 60 students and faculty members participated. SUNY Korea will hold a series of department seminars during fall 2019 that will be open to all those interested. Find information on upcoming seminars on SUNY Korea’s social media channels: Facebook Naver Blog / Instagram


  • For more information or to apply for Computer Science at SUNY Korea, please click here.


  • Written by Sungwon Hyun
  • Edited by Leanne-Patterson Shin